Calendar

February  2017
SMTWTFS
 1
  • IoP lunch seminar
    Starts: 01/02/2017 -  1:00 pm
    Ends: 01/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
2
  • ITFA staff lunch
    Starts: 02/02/2017 -  1:00 pm
    Ends: 02/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
    Location: C4.124
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  • facultair colloquium
    Starts: 06/02/2017 -  10:00 am
    Ends: 06/02/2017 - 11:00 am
  • faculty colloquium
    Starts: 06/02/2017 -  10:00 am
    Ends: 06/02/2017 - 11:00 am
    Location: C1.110
    Description: 10.00 Dean's perspective
    10.15 Scientific highlights from one of the research institutes
    10.30 Guest speaker
  • GRAPPA Journal Club
    Starts: 06/02/2017 -  1:30 pm
    Ends: 06/02/2017 - 2:30 pm
    Location: C4.174
7
  • Promotie dhr. Bo Shi
    Starts: 07/02/2017 -  12:00 pm
    Ends: 07/02/2017 - 1:00 pm
    Location: Agnietenkapel, Oudezijds Voorburgwal 229-231, 1012 EZ Amsterdam, Nederland
    Description: Voorzitter is Karel Gaemers
  • WZI staff lunch
    Starts: 07/02/2017 -  12:30 pm
    Ends: 07/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
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  • ITFA staff lunch
    Starts: 09/02/2017 -  1:00 pm
    Ends: 09/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
    Location: C4.124
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  • Noam Libeskind (AIP Postdam)
    Starts: 13/02/2017 - 12:00 am
    Ends: 14/02/2017 - 12:00 am
    Description: Title: Satellite Galaxies, Local Groups and the Cosmic Web

    Abstract:
    The local group of galaxies is a unique place in the universe: its proximity means that near field objects can be studied in unprecedented detail. The local group contains dozens of dwarf galaxies, the smallest yet most most abundant cosmological objects in existence. Owing to their low luminosity, they can only be seen in the immediate neighborhood of the Milky Way. Observations of these galaxies can help us understand key aspects of the Local Group including the nature of dark matter, our place in the cosmos, and how our specific corner of the universe is embedded in the large scale structure that surrounds us. How typical is the Local Group? How typical is our cosmic neighborhood? Many of these galaxies have only been recently found and since their discovery have presented the paradigm of structure/galaxy formation (known as the LCDM model) with a number of challenges. Specifically, dwarf galaxies in the Local Group appear to cluster on vast thin planes, an as yet unresolved problem for the model. I will present some ideas to explain the origin of this peculiar set up within the LCDM model, as well as the first observations of a similar set-up around a galaxy exterior to the Local Group. I will proceed to describe the local group, including its place in the cosmos as seen through the lens of peculiar velocity surveys.
  • GRAPPA Journal Club
    Starts: 13/02/2017 -  1:30 pm
    Ends: 13/02/2017 - 2:30 pm
    Location: C4.174
141516
  • ITFA staff lunch
    Starts: 16/02/2017 -  1:00 pm
    Ends: 16/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
    Location: C4.124
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  • GRAPPA Journal Club
    Starts: 20/02/2017 -  1:30 pm
    Ends: 20/02/2017 - 2:30 pm
    Location: C4.174
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  • ITFA staff lunch
    Starts: 23/02/2017 -  1:00 pm
    Ends: 23/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
    Location: C4.124
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  • ITFA masters lunch
    Starts: 24/02/2017 -  11:00 am
    Ends: 24/02/2017 - 12:00 pm
  • Promotie dhr. A.L. La Rooij
    Starts: 24/02/2017 -  1:00 pm
    Ends: 24/02/2017 - 2:00 pm
    Location: Aula UvA, Spui, 1012 Amsterdam, Nederland
    Description: Voorzitter is Jaap Franse
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  • Denis Erkal
    Starts: 27/02/2017 - 12:00 pm
    Ends: 27/02/2017 - 1:00 pm
    Description: Title: Dark matter implications of perturbations detected in tidal streams
    Abstract: Tidal streams are simple structures which can be used to infer the presence of dark matter clumps. Recent observations have shown that the Pal 5 stream, the brightest globular stream around the Milky Way, has been perturbed. If these perturbations are due to dark matter, they are consistent with an impact by two subhaloes (clumps), the lightest of which is in the 10^6-10^7 solar mass range. I will discuss how we can infer that the stream has been perturbed, other possible mechanisms which could create the perturbation, and how we will be able to distinguish these mechanisms and constrain the properties of the dark subhaloes in the era of Gaia and, eventually, LSST. I will also discuss how this technique can be used to probe any model of dark matter which produces clumps in the mass range 10^5-10^8 solar masses.
  • GRAPPA Journal Club
    Starts: 27/02/2017 -  1:30 pm
    Ends: 27/02/2017 - 2:30 pm
    Location: C4.174
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